Poetry Analysis: Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard – Part 5

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Thomas Gray's elegy
Thomas Gray’s elegy
Source: geograph.org.uk (creative commons license)

Hey, you’ve successfully read the four elegy analysis articles and this is the last one left! Well, I guess this won’t be taking you much time since you’ve already understood the essence of the poem! Have you fell in love with Gray and the villagers of Stoke Poges! Well, as you complete with elegy, there’s a gift for you! A Knowledge that can really help you manage your life in a better way! Don’t miss it!

A quick link to the previous stanzas!

Stanza1 to Stanza 6

Stanza 7 to Stanza 11

Stanza 12 to Stanza 17

Stanza 18 to Stanza 24

Stanza 25:

The poet visualizes that after his departure from this world some white haired peasants might say, “Often he was seen at daybreak, walking fast and sweeping the dew drops with his feet and reaching the churchyard at daybreak.

Amidst all odds and frustrations expressed in the poem, Gray presents his readers with a deep sense of harmony, once that can be associated with the life of the villagers of Stoke Poges.

Stanza 26:

At the foot of that bending tree, which has grown old with the passage of time and having its roots risen out from earth? The poet stretches himself in a lazy manner during the noon, and ponders over the dead rustic by looking at the soft murmuring brook.

Stanza 27:

The poet, Thomas Gray wondered close by the woods (the he would loiter aimlessly, sad and depressed. He was lonely, as appeared from his face. He was terribly worried about the hopelessness of love which made him go crazy.

Stanza 28:

Some old peasant might say some morning that he could not be found on the hills which he used to walk along, nor could he to walk along the heath. Another morning came and he was not found resting under the shade of the old tree near the brook, neither in the lawn not in the woods.

Stanza 29:

On the final morning, his dead body was carried in a funeral procession with funeral lamentation, slowly leading its way to the church. Let the passerby read the epitaph on his grave stone beneath the old hawthorn tree.

Stanza 30:

Here the poet lies buried upon the lap of Earth. He was neither famous nor fortunate enough to acquire wealth. He was knowledgeable although he was born in a modest family. His life was devoid of happiness as he was destined to live a life of sorrow and misery.

Stanza 31:

He was indeed a sincere soul, liberal and charitable. He was well rewarded from God. He gifted and left all that he had at the disposal of the miserable and poor people. In return, he received the love and affection of God and also of his fellow friends.

Stanza 32:

No one need to further inquire about his merits and faults at the same time. His merits lies in the bosom of God waiting to be rewarded with his faults and weaknesses waits for the Judgment Day when he will be punished for his treason (if any).

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3 Comments
  1. Avatar
    Ruchika agrawal says

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  2. Avatar
    Ruchika agrawal says

    Thanks.very good website.very helpful indeed.thorough explanation provided.

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    Sivasankar K says

    Most helpful.. Simplified yet effective..Great Scholarly service.. Thank you

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